Thursday, November 4, 2021

g-f(2)629 THE BIG PICTURE OF THE DIGITAL AGE (11/4/2021), geniouxfacts, The MIT SMR + BCG report is an exceptional “Full Pack Golden Knowledge Container”


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"g-f" fishing of golden knowledge (GK) of the fabulous treasure of the digital ageArtificial Intelligence, Full Pack Golden Knowledge Container (11/4/2021)  g-f(2)426 


Opportunity

EXCEPTIONAL “Full Pack Golden Knowledge Container”, geniouxfacts


  • Within the fabulous treasure of the digital age, containers of rare golden knowledge can be fished.
  • The report of MIT SMR + BCG, “The Cultural Benefits of Artificial Intelligence in the Enterprise”, is an EXCEPTIONAL Full Pack Golden Knowledge Container because its research and results are of extraordinary importance and quality. g-f(2)626
  • GOLDEN KNOWLEDGE CONTENTS:
    1. Executive Summary
    2. Introduction: Cultural Benefits of AI
    3. Team-Level Cultural Benefits
    4. Organization-Level Cultural Benefits
    5. Conclusion


          Genioux knowledge fact condensed as an image



          References


          S. Ransbotham, F. Candelon, D. Kiron, B. LaFountain, and S. Khodabandeh, “The Cultural Benefits of Artificial Intelligence in the Enterprise,” MIT Sloan Management Review and Boston Consulting Group, November 2021.


          ABOUT THE AUTHORS, MIT SMR + BCG


          • Sam Ransbotham is a professor in the information systems department at the Carroll School of Management at Boston College, as well as guest editor for MIT Sloan Management Review’s Artificial Intelligence and Business Strategy Big Ideas initiative.
          • François Candelon is a senior partner and managing director at BCG and the global director of the BCG Henderson Institute. He can be contacted at candelon.francois@bcg.com.
          • David Kiron is the editorial director of MIT Sloan Management Review and is program lead for its Future of the Workforce and Artificial Intelligence and Business Strategy projects. He can be contacted at dkiron@mit.edu.
          • Shervin Khodabandeh is a senior partner and managing director at BCG and the coleader of BCG GAMMA (BCG’s AI practice) in North America. He can be contacted at shervin@bcg.com.
          • Burt LaFountain is a partner and managing director at BCG and a core member of BCG GAMMA. He can be reached at lafountain.burt@bcg.com.


          Extra-condensed knowledge


          Lessons learned, MIT SMR + BCG


          • Building a culture that supports innovation with AI has an effect on competitiveness. Our research found that respondents who use AI primarily to explore new ways of creating value are far more likely to improve their ability to compete with AI than those who use AI primarily to improve existing processes. Respondents who said they use AI primarily to explore were 2.7 times more likely to agree that their company captures opportunities from adjacent industries — because of AI — than respondents who use AI primarily to improve existing processes.
          • Using AI doesn’t merely help with effectiveness at the team level (such as by improving efficiency and decision quality); managers can also use AI to improve an organization’s competitiveness. For instance, innovating new processes with AI appears to enhance a company’s ability to compete with both existing and new rivals. We compared respondents who said they are using AI primarily to innovate existing processes with those who agreed that their company is using AI primarily to explore new ways of creating value. (See Figure 6.) Respondents who agreed that they are using AI primarily to explore new ways of creating value were 2.5 times more likely to agree that AI is helping their company defend against competitors and 2.7 times more likely to agree that AI is helping their company capture opportunities in adjacent industries. Exploration with AI is correlated — to a greater extent — with improved competitiveness than exploitation with AI.
          • Whether it’s reconsidering business assumptions or empowering teams, managing relationships among culture, AI use, and organizational effectiveness is critical to increasing AI’s value to an organization. This report offers a data-driven analysis of these relationships at both the team and organization levels.


          Condensed knowledge




          Lessons learned, MIT SMR + BCG


            • AI that is effective at the team level, however, doesn’t always yield financial success at the organization level. Only 11% of organizations in our survey attributed substantial financial benefits to their AI initiatives, which is the same result we obtained from our survey last year.2 It may be that few companies are implementing AI at a scale sufficient to generate “substantial” financial benefits. But another possible explanation is that those organizations that obtain substantial financial benefits have begun to master the C-U-E dynamic. They learned both how to culturally adopt and benefit from AI, and how to use AI to glean financial rewards. Our research suggests that these are connected, not separate, activities.
            • AI-based solutions that generate new ways of working can incite resistance from teams entrenched in existing cultures. Anju Gupta, vice president of data science and analytics at Northwestern Mutual, acknowledges that when companies introduce new AI initiatives, “there is this natural resistance that you’ll bump up against.” Culture is like a team’s immune system: It is for the group what defense mechanisms are for the individual.
              • Our research indicates that managers often recognize the need to cultivate team acceptance of AI, such as by including end users in the development process, building trust in AI system performance, and encouraging teams to be open to changing their work processes. 
            • Our findings also distinguish the culture change required to adopt AI from cultural changes that emerge after adopting AI. 



                  Some relevant characteristics of this "genioux fact"

                  • Category 2: The Big Picture of the Digital Age
                  • [genioux fact deduced or extracted from MIT SMR + BCG]
                  • This is a “genioux fact fast solution.”
                  • Tag Opportunities those travelling at high speed on GKPath
                  • Type of essential knowledge of this “genioux fact”: Essential Analyzed Knowledge (EAK).
                  • Type of validity of the "genioux fact". 

                    • Inherited from sources + Supported by the knowledge of one or more experts + Supported by research.


                  References


                  “genioux facts”: The online programme on MASTERING “THE BIG PICTURE OF THE DIGITAL AGE”, g-f(2)629, Fernando Machuca, November 4, 2021, blog.geniouxfacts.comgeniouxfacts.comGenioux.com Corporation.


                  ABOUT THE AUTHORS


                  PhD with awarded honors in computer science in France

                  Fernando is the director of "genioux facts". He is the entrepreneur, researcher and professor who has a disruptive proposal in The Digital Age to improve the world and reduce poverty + ignorance + violence. A critical piece of the solution puzzle is "genioux facts"The Innovation Value of "genioux facts" is exceptional for individuals, companies and any kind of organization.




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