Friday, August 6, 2021

g-f(2)409 THE BIG PICTURE OF THE DIGITAL AGE (8/6/2021), HBR, The Rules of Co-opetition




ULTRA-condensed knowledge


Opportunity, A better understanding of co-opetition will help businesses, managers, and countries find a better way to work and succeed together, HBR
  • There is a name for the mix of competition and cooperation: co-opetition.
  • People tend to think in either/or terms, as in either compete or cooperate, rather than compete and cooperate. Doing both at once requires mental flexibility; it doesn’t come naturally.
  • Today the opportunities for countries to cooperate are even larger—from tackling Covid-19 and climate change to resolving trade wars. 
    Lesson learned, Rivals are working together more than ever before
    • The practice of  co-opetition is common in a wide range of industries, having been adopted by rivals such as Apple and Samsung, DHL and UPS, Ford and GM, and Google and Yahoo. 
    • There are many reasons for competitors to cooperate. At the simplest level, it can be a way to save costs and avoid duplication of effort.
    Opportunity, Changing Minds
    • Cooperation with rivals also has an important emotional aspect. Some people are comfortable with the idea that there can be multiple winners, and some are not. As a result, co-opetition may end up being a strategy of last resort even in cases where it should be a first resort.
    • Co-opetition raises strategic questions, however. How will the competitive dynamics in your industry change if you cooperate—or if you don’t? Will you be able to safeguard your most valuable assets? Careful analysis is required. In this article we’ll provide a practical framework for thinking through the decision to cooperate with rivals.
    • Suppose you’ve analyzed the alternatives to cooperation and tentatively decided to move ahead. Doing so may mean sharing your special sauce. Then it might not be so special, and that could be a real problem. To get a read on the potential risk, figure out which of the four categories the deal falls into.

      Genioux knowledge fact condensed as an image


      Condensed knowledge


      Opportunity, A better understanding of co-opetition will help businesses, managers, and countries find a better way to work and succeed together, HBR
      • There is a name for the mix of competition and cooperation: co-opetition.
      • People tend to think in either/or terms, as in either compete or cooperate, rather than compete and cooperate. Doing both at once requires mental flexibility; it doesn’t come naturally.
      • Today the opportunities for countries to cooperate are even larger—from tackling Covid-19 and climate change to resolving trade wars. 
        Lesson learned, Rivals are working together more than ever before
        • The practice of  co-opetition is common in a wide range of industries, having been adopted by rivals such as Apple and Samsung, DHL and UPS, Ford and GM, and Google and Yahoo. 
        • There are many reasons for competitors to cooperate. At the simplest level, it can be a way to save costs and avoid duplication of effort.
        Opportunity, Changing Minds
        • Cooperation with rivals also has an important emotional aspect. Some people are comfortable with the idea that there can be multiple winners, and some are not. As a result, co-opetition may end up being a strategy of last resort even in cases where it should be a first resort.
        • Co-opetition raises strategic questions, however. How will the competitive dynamics in your industry change if you cooperate—or if you don’t? Will you be able to safeguard your most valuable assets? Careful analysis is required. In this article we’ll provide a practical framework for thinking through the decision to cooperate with rivals.
        • Suppose you’ve analyzed the alternatives to cooperation and tentatively decided to move ahead. Doing so may mean sharing your special sauce. Then it might not be so special, and that could be a real problem. To get a read on the potential risk, figure out which of the four categories the deal falls into.


        Category 2: The Big Picture of the Digital Age

        [genioux fact deduced or extracted from HBR]

        This is a “genioux fact fast solution.”

        Tag Opportunities those travelling at high speed on GKPath

        Type of essential knowledge of this “genioux fact”: Essential Analyzed Knowledge (EAK).

        Type of validity of the "genioux fact". 

        • Inherited from sources + Supported by the knowledge of one or more experts.


        Authors of the genioux fact

        Fernando Machuca


        References


        The Rules of Co-opetitionAdam Brandenburger and Barry Nalebuff, From the Magazine (January–February 2021), Harvard Business Review.


        ABOUT THE AUTHORS


        Adam Brandenburger


        Adam Brandenburger is the J.P. Valles Professor at the Stern School of Business, a distinguished professor at the Tandon School of Engineering, and the faculty director of the Program on Creativity and Innovation at NYU Shanghai, all at New York University. 


        Brandenburger holds appointments at New York University as J.P. Valles Professor at the Stern School of Business, Distinguished Professor at the Tandon School of Engineering, Faculty Director of the NYU Shanghai Program on Creativity + Innovation, and Global Network Professor. He was a professor at Harvard Business School from 1987 to 2002. He received his B.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Cambridge. Adam researches in the areas of game theory, information theory, and business strategy.


        Barry Nalebuff


        Barry Nalebuff is the Milton Steinbach Professor of Management at the Yale School of Management, where he teaches negotiation, innovation, strategy, and game theory.

        Barry Nalebuff is Milton Steinbach Professor at Yale SOM where for thirty years he has taught negotiation, innovation, strategy, and game theory. He is the coauthor of six books and an online course. Thinking Strategically and The Art of Strategy are two crossover books on game theory with over 400,000 copies in print. Co-opetition looks beyond zero-sum games to emphasize the potential for cooperating while competing. Why Not? offers a framework for problem solving and ingenuity. Lifecycle Investing provides a new strategy for retirement investing. Mission in a Bottle tells the story of Honest Tea. His Negotiation course (available for free on Coursera) has 350,000 active learners and the second-highest rating on the Coursera platform.


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