Monday, October 11, 2021

g-f(2)559 THE BIG PICTURE OF THE DIGITAL AGE (10/11/2021), WSJ, The Real Meaning of Freedom at Work




ULTRA-condensed knowledge


"g-f" fishing of golden knowledge (GK) of the fabulous treasure of the digital ageDigital Transformation, Flexible work (10/11/2021)  g-f(2)426 


Opportunity 

The Real Meaning of Freedom at Work, WSJ 


    • Flexibility is now the fastest-rising job priority in the U.S., according to a poll of more than 5,000 LinkedIn members. More than half of Americans want their next job to be self-employed—some as entrepreneurs, others as freelancers in the gig economy or content curators in the creator economy.
    • Extensive research suggests that when employees have the flexibility to customize their work, they’re more effective, more satisfied and more likely to stay.
    • Flexible work is here to stay, but companies that resist it may not be.
    • The biggest source of positive liberty may be the freedom to decide when and how much we work.
    • For several generations, we’ve organized our lives around our work. Our jobs have determined where we make our homes, when we see our families and what we can squeeze in during our downtime. It might be time to start planning our work around our lives.


          Genioux knowledge fact condensed as an image






          Extra-condensed knowledge


          Opportunity 

          Real flexibility, WSJ


          • The debate about whether work should be in-person, remote-first or hybrid is too narrow. Yes, people want the freedom to decide where they work. But they also want the freedom to decide who they work with, what they work on and when they work. Real flexibility is having autonomy to choose your people, your purpose and your priorities.



          Condensed knowledge




          Lessons learned, WSJ 



          • Remote work has granted us some negative liberties. It can release employees from the manacles of micromanagers, the trap of traffic jams and the cacophony of open offices. But it has also created new constraints on time. Even before Covid, many people reported spending the majority of their work time in meetings and on emails. Once everyone was reachable around the clock, collaboration overload only got worse.
          • In a study led by economist Michael Gibbs, when more than 10,000 employees of a large Asian IT company started working from home during the pandemic, productivity fell even as working hours increased. The researchers didn’t measure the physical and emotional toll of Covid, but the data showed that people got less done because they had less time to focus. They were stuck in more group meetings and got interrupted more often.
          • To free people from these constraints, we need better boundaries. 
          • There’s evidence that working from home has been more stressful for “segmentors” who prefer to separate the different spheres of life than for “integrators” who are happy to blur the lines. 
          • One effective strategy seems to be blocking quiet time in the mornings as a window for deep work, and then coming together after lunch. When virtual meetings are held in the afternoon, people are less likely to multitask—probably in part because they’ve been able to make progress on their own tasks.
          • Over the past year and a half, we’ve discovered a new constraint of remote work: Zoom fatigue is real. 
          • New research reveals that having voice-only conversations isn’t just less exhausting; there are times when it can be more effective. 
          • It’s well documented that many managers mistake visibility for value and reward presence instead of performance. 
          • One source of positive liberty is the freedom to choose who we interact with and learn from. After more than 60,000 employees at Microsoft transitioned to remote work during the pandemic, researchers found that their personal networks became more siloed and static. There were fewer new connections between people, fewer bridges between teams and fewer real-time conversations within groups. That made it tougher to acquire and share knowledge.




          Some relevant characteristics of this "genioux fact"

          • Category 2: The Big Picture of the Digital Age
          • [genioux fact deduced or extracted from WSJ]
          • This is a “genioux fact fast solution.”
          • Tag Opportunities those travelling at high speed on GKPath
          • Type of essential knowledge of this “genioux fact”: Essential Analyzed Knowledge (EAK).
          • Type of validity of the "genioux fact". 

            • Inherited from sources + Supported by the knowledge of one or more experts.


          References


          “genioux facts”: The online programme on MASTERING “THE BIG PICTURE OF THE DIGITAL AGE”, g-f(2)559, Fernando Machuca, October 11, 2021, blog.geniouxfacts.comgeniouxfacts.comGenioux.com Corporation.


          ABOUT THE AUTHORS


          PhD with awarded honors in computer science in France

          Fernando is the director of "genioux facts". He is the entrepreneur, researcher and professor who has a disruptive proposal in The Digital Age to improve the world and reduce poverty + ignorance + violence. A critical piece of the solution puzzle is "genioux facts"The Innovation Value of "genioux facts" is exceptional for individuals, companies and any kind of organization.




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