Monday, May 31, 2021

g-f(2)304 The big picture of the digital age (5/31/2021), Knowledge@Wharton, How to understand what started THE THIRD DIGITAL REVOLUTION.




Extra-condensed knowledge


Computerized fabrication such as 3-D printing is the beginning of a trend to change data into objects.

Knowledge@Wharton: What started this third digital revolution?
  • Alan Gershenfeld:  
    • It’s actually a continuum. We’ve had a revolution in digital computation, we’ve had a revolution in digital communication, and both have changed the world.
    • We use Gordon Moore’s 1965 paper as a powerful point, where he was looking back 10 years at the doubling of digital computing performance and projecting what would happen 10 years forward if that exponential curve continued. 
      • He predicted things like mobile phones and smart cars, not because he was Nostradamus. 
      • He was simply observing a past trend of technology doubling and projecting forward.
    • Well, it’s happened for 50 years with close to a billion-fold improvement.
    • Neil Gershenfeld, who heads The Center for Bits and Atoms at MIT, has also looked back 10 years and seen the doubling of digital fabrication performance.
    • When we project forward 10, 20, 30 or 40 years and a potential billion-fold improvement in digital fabrication performance, it will once again change the world. 
      • That is THE THIRD DIGITAL REVOLUTION.


ULTRA-condensed knowledge


Warning, Alan Gershenfeld
  • “The third digital revolution, much like the first two digital revolutions back in 1965, is largely going unnoticed or not fully understood.” 


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How to understand what started THE THIRD DIGITAL REVOLUTION
Computerized fabrication such as 3-D printing is the beginning of a trend to change data into objects.

Knowledge@Wharton: What started this third digital revolution?
  • Alan Gershenfeld:  
    • It’s actually a continuum. We’ve had a revolution in digital computation, we’ve had a revolution in digital communication, and both have changed the world.
    • We use Gordon Moore’s 1965 paper as a powerful point, where he was looking back 10 years at the doubling of digital computing performance and projecting what would happen 10 years forward if that exponential curve continued. 
      • He predicted things like mobile phones and smart cars, not because he was Nostradamus. 
      • He was simply observing a past trend of technology doubling and projecting forward.
    • Well, it’s happened for 50 years with close to a billion-fold improvement.
    • Neil Gershenfeld, who heads The Center for Bits and Atoms at MIT, has also looked back 10 years and seen the doubling of digital fabrication performance.
    • When we project forward 10, 20, 30 or 40 years and a potential billion-fold improvement in digital fabrication performance, it will once again change the world. 
      • That is THE THIRD DIGITAL REVOLUTION.

Warning, Alan Gershenfeld
  • “The third digital revolution, much like the first two digital revolutions back in 1965, is largely going unnoticed or not fully understood.” 

Category 2: The Big Picture of the Digital Age

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Warning, Alan Gershenfeld
  • “The third digital revolution, much like the first two digital revolutions back in 1965, is largely going unnoticed or not fully understood.” 

Type of essential knowledge of this “genioux fact”: Essential Analyzed Knowledge (EAK).

Type of validity of the "genioux fact". 

  • Inherited from sources + Supported by the knowledge of one or more experts + Supported by research.


Authors of the genioux fact

Fernando Machuca


References


Are You Ready for the Third Digital Revolution? Knowledge@Wharton show, which airs on SiriusXM channel, March 20, 2018, Knowledge@Wharton.


ABOUT THE AUTHORS


INTRODUCTION TO THE PODCAST

The first two digital revolutions — computing and communications — transformed society. Now comes the third, which is fabrication, argues the new book, Designing Reality. The authors say that computerized fabrication such as 3-D printing is the beginning of a trend to change data into objects. But like any revolution, not all populations will benefit equally. The book, which is aimed at helping people prepare for the next tech wave, was written by three brothers: Alan Gershenfeld, president of E-Line Media and former chairman of Games for Change; Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld, a professor at Brandeis University; and Neil Gershenfeld, who heads The Center for Bits and Atoms at MIT. Alan Gerhsenfeld and Cutcher-Gershenfeld talked about their book on the Knowledge@Wharton show, which airs on SiriusXM channel 111.


Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld is a professor at the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University. Alan Gershenfeld is cofounder and president of E-Line Media. Neil Gershenfeld is the director of MIT’s Center for Bits and Atoms.

Professor
joelcg@brandeis.edu
Departments/Programs

The Heller School for Social Policy and Management
Degrees

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Ph.D.
Cornell University, B.S.
Expertise

Joel has field expertise in social impact enterprises, large-scale systems change, high performance work systems, negotiation and dispute resolution, cyberinfrastructure, labor-management relations, new technology, and related matters. He has led change initiatives at team, enterprise, industry, national, and international levels. As a scholar, Joel has advanced theory and method in industrial relations, negotiations, institutional analysis, organizational behavior, information systems, employment law, cross-cultural studies, and other areas of social science.


Alan Gershenfeld has spent the last twenty years at the intersection of entertainment, technology, and social entrepreneurship. He is currently President and Cofounder of E-Line Media, a publisher of digital entertainment that engages, educates and empowers— with a core focus on computer and video games. Alan has worked on impact game projects with the Gates Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, the National Science Foundation, USAID, DARPA, the White House OSTP, the California Endowment, the Cook Inlet Tribal Council, Games for Change, Google, Sesame Workshop, the MIT Center for Bits and Atoms, and the ASU Center for Games and Impact. Prior to E-Line, he was CEO and Cofounder of neomat, a leader in mobile and web community solutions. 


Prof. Neil Gershenfeld is the Director of MIT's Center for Bits and Atoms, where his unique laboratory is breaking down boundaries between the digital and physical worlds, from pioneering quantum computing to digital fabrication to the Internet of Things. Technology from his lab has been seen and used in settings including New York's Museum of Modern Art and rural Indian villages, the White House and the World Economic Forum, inner-city community centers and automobile safety systems, Las Vegas shows and Sami herds. 
  • He is the author of numerous technical publications, patents, and books including Designing Reality, Fab, When Things Start To Think, The Nature of Mathematical Modeling, and The Physics of Information Technology, and has been featured in media such as The New York Times, The Economist, NPR, CNN, and PBS. 
  • He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Physical Society, has been named one of Scientific American's 50 leaders in science and technology, as one of 40 Modern-Day Leonardos by the Museum of Science and Industry, one of Popular Mechanic's 25 Makers, has been selected as a CNN/Time/Fortune Principal Voice, and by Prospect/Foreign Policy as one of the top 100 public intellectuals. 
  • He's been called the intellectual father of the maker movement, founding a growing global network of over one thousand fab labs that provide widespread access to prototype tools for personal fabrication, directing the Fab Academy for distributed research and education in the principles and practices of digital fabrication, and chairing the Fab Foundation. 
  • Dr. Gershenfeld has a BA in Physics with High Honors from Swarthmore College, a Ph.D. in Applied Physics from Cornell University, honorary doctorates from Swarthmore College, Strathclyde University and the University of Antwerp, was a Junior Fellow of the Harvard University Society of Fellows, and a member of the research staff at Bell Labs.


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