Thursday, May 13, 2021

g-f(2)274 The Big Picture of the Digital Age (5/13/2021), HBR, How to Do Hybrid Right.



Extra-condensed knowledge


When designing flexible work arrangements, focus on individual human concerns, not just institutional ones. 
  • For 10 years, I’ve led the Future of Work Consortium, which has brought together more than 100 companies from across the world to research future trends, identify current good practice, and learn from emerging experiments.
    • Since the pandemic I’ve focused our research on the extraordinary impact that Covid-19 is having on working arrangements.
    • As part of that effort, I’ve talked extensively to executives, many of whom, like Hiroki Hiramatsu, the head of global HR at Fujitsu, report that they’ve detected a silver lining in our collective struggle to adapt to the pandemic. 
  • Executives told me that given the astonishing speed with which companies have adopted the technology of virtual work, and the extent to which most employees don’t want to revert to past ways of working, they’re seeing a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to reset work using a hybrid model—one that, if we can get it right, will allow us to make our work lives more purposeful, productive, agile, and flexible.


Genioux knowledge fact condensed as an image


Condensed knowledge


  • When designing flexible work arrangements, focus on individual human concerns, not just institutional ones. 
    • For 10 years, I’ve led the Future of Work Consortium, which has brought together more than 100 companies from across the world to research future trends, identify current good practice, and learn from emerging experiments.
      • Since the pandemic I’ve focused our research on the extraordinary impact that Covid-19 is having on working arrangements.
      • As part of that effort, I’ve talked extensively to executives, many of whom, like Hiroki Hiramatsu, the head of global HR at Fujitsu, report that they’ve detected a silver lining in our collective struggle to adapt to the pandemic. 
    • Executives told me that given the astonishing speed with which companies have adopted the technology of virtual work, and the extent to which most employees don’t want to revert to past ways of working, they’re seeing a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to reset work using a hybrid model—one that, if we can get it right, will allow us to make our work lives more purposeful, productive, agile, and flexible.


Category 2: The Big Picture of the Digital Age

[genioux fact deduced or extracted from HBR]

This is a “genioux fact fast solution.”

Tag Alerts those traveling at high speed on GKPath

Alert, HBR,

  • Executives are seeing a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to reset work using a hybrid model.

Type of essential knowledge of this “genioux fact”: Essential Analyzed Knowledge (EAK).

Type of validity of the "genioux fact". 

  • Inherited from sources + Supported by the knowledge of one or more experts + Supported by research.


Authors of the genioux fact

Fernando Machuca


References




ABOUT THE AUTHORS


Lynda Gratton (@lyndagratton) is a professor of management practice at London Business School and founder of the future-of-work research consultancy HSM. She currently serves as cochair of the World Economic Forum’s Global Future Council on the New Agenda for Work, Wages, and Job Creation. Her latest book (with Andrew J. Scott) is The New Long Life: A Framework for Flourishing in a Changing World (Bloomsbury, 2020).


Extracted from London Business School


Lynda Gratton
Professor of Management Practice

BA PhD (Liverpool)
Lynda is a Professor of Management Practice at London Business School where she directs the program ‘Human Resource Strategy in Transforming Companies’ – considered the world’s leading program on human resources. Her elective on the Future of Work is one of the school’s most popular and in 2016 she received the school’s ‘Excellence in Teaching’ award. For over ten years she has led the Future of Work Consortium which has brought executives from more than 60 companies together both virtually and on a bespoke collaborative platform.

Lynda has written extensively about the interface between people and organizations. Her books cover the link between business and HR strategy (Living Strategy), the new ways of working (The Democratic Enterprise), the rise of complex collaboration (Hot Spots and Glow) the impact of a changing world on employment and work (The Shift ) and the impact of longevity on society (The 100 Year Life – co-authored with Andrew Scott). In 2012 The Shift received the best book of the year in Japan and has been translated into more than 15 languages. In 2015 The Key won the CMI Management Book of the Year. In 2017 The 100 Year Life was shortlisted for the FT Business Book of the Year, became the best selling book in Japan and has been translated into 15 languages.

Lynda’s work has been acknowledged globally – she has won the Tata prize in India; in the US she has been named as the annual Fellow of NAHR and won the CCL prize; whilst in Australia she has won the HR prize. She has been named by Thinkers 50 has one of the top 15 thinkers in the world.


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