Friday, May 24, 2024

g-f(2)2420 The College Conundrum: Is Higher Education Worth the Cost?

 


genioux Fact post by Fernando Machuca and Copilot



Introduction: 


The article "Is College Worth It?" from Pew Research Center provides a comprehensive analysis of the perceived value of a college degree in today’s economic climate. It explores various perspectives, including economic outcomes, public opinion, and partisan views.



genioux GK Nugget: 


"Despite improved economic outcomes for young adults, both with and without degrees, the perception of the importance and worth of a college degree is mixed among U.S. adults." — Fernando Machuca and Copilot, May 24, 2024



genioux Foundational Fact: 


The article reveals that while economic outcomes for young adults have improved over the past decade, the earnings gap between those with and without a college degree has not narrowed. Public opinion on the importance of a college degree is divided, with only a quarter of U.S. adults believing it’s crucial for securing a well-paying job. Furthermore, only 22% believe that the cost of obtaining a four-year college degree is worth it, even if it involves taking out loans.



The 10 Most Relevant genioux Facts:




  1. Economic outcomes for young adults, both with and without degrees, have improved.
  2. The earnings gap between young adults with and without a college degree has not narrowed.
  3. Only one-in-four U.S. adults say it’s extremely or very important to have a four-year college degree to get a well-paying job.
  4. About half (49%) say it’s less important to have a four-year college degree today to get a well-paying job than it was 20 years ago.
  5. Only 22% say the cost of getting a four-year college degree today is worth it even if someone has to take out loans.
  6. Views on the cost of college differ by Americans’ level of education.
  7. Even among four-year college graduates, only about a third (32%) say college is worth the cost even if someone has to take out loans.
  8. Views on the importance of college differ widely by partisanship.
  9. Republicans and Republican-leaning independents are more likely than Democrats and Democratic leaners to say that a college degree is less important now than it was 20 years ago.
  10. The report comes amid rising tuition costs and mounting student debt, leading to a debate on the value of higher education.



Conclusion: 


The article “Is College Worth It?” presents a nuanced view of the value of a college degree in today’s society. While economic outcomes have improved for young adults, the perceived importance and worth of a college degree vary widely among U.S. adults. These findings highlight the ongoing debate about the value of higher education in the face of rising costs and increasing student debt.





REFERENCES

The g-f GK Context







ABOUT THE AUTHORS


Richard Fry is a senior researcher at Pew Research Center. He is an expert on school and college enrollment in the United States, as well as the returns to education in the labor market and marriage market, and its connection to household economic well-being such as net worth.

Dana Braga is a research assistant focusing on social and demographic research at Pew Research Center.

Kim Parker is director of social trends research at Pew Research Center. She oversees research on emerging social and demographic trends, manages major survey projects, and writes and edits reports.



Classical Summary:


The article "Is College Worth It?" from Pew Research Center, published on May 23, 2024, discusses the value of a college degree in the current economic climate¹. Here's a summary:


  • Economic outcomes for young adults, both with and without degrees, have improved. Wages for U.S. workers aged 25 to 34 without a bachelor’s degree have increased over the past 10 years, and their overall wealth has risen. Fewer are living in poverty today¹.
  • The gap in earnings between young adults with and without a college degree has not narrowed, as things have also improved for young college graduates¹.
  • Public opinion on the importance of a college degree is mixed. Only one-in-four U.S. adults say it’s extremely or very important to have a four-year college degree to get a well-paying job in today’s economy¹.
  • About half (49%) say it’s less important to have a four-year college degree today to get a well-paying job than it was 20 years ago¹.
  • Only 22% say the cost of getting a four-year college degree today is worth it even if someone has to take out loans¹.
  • Views on the cost of college differ by Americans’ level of education. Even among four-year college graduates, only about a third (32%) say college is worth the cost even if someone has to take out loans¹.
  • Views on the importance of college differ widely by partisanship. Republicans and Republican-leaning independents are more likely than Democrats and Democratic leaners to say that a college degree is less important now than it was 20 years ago¹.


This report comes amid rising tuition costs and mounting student debt, leading to a debate on the value of higher education¹.


Source: Conversation with Copilot, 5/24/2024

(1) Is a College Degree Worth It in 2024? | Pew Research Center. https://www.pewresearch.org/social-trends/2024/05/23/is-college-worth-it-2/.

(2) Is College Worth It? | Pew Research Center. https://www.pewresearch.org/social-trends/2011/05/15/is-college-worth-it/.

(3) Is College Worth It? | Pew Research Center. https://www.pewresearch.org/short-reads/2011/01/10/test-number-57-is-college-worth-it/.

(4) Do you need a college degree to succeed? Here's what the data shows.. https://www.cbsnews.com/news/college-degree-income-is-college-worth-it-pew/.





Richard Fry 


Richard Fry is a senior researcher at Pew Research Center, specializing in demographics and social trends¹. He is an expert on school and college enrollment in the United States, as well as the returns to education in the labor market and marriage market, and its connection to household economic well-being such as net worth¹.


Fry's analyses are largely empirical, as he has extensive expertise analyzing U.S. Census Bureau and other federal data collections¹. Before joining Pew Research Center in 2002, he was a senior economist at the Educational Testing Service¹. Fry received his doctorate in economics from the University of Michigan¹.


He regularly documents U.S. educational and enrollment milestones, the economic well-being of the nation’s young adults, the role of student debt in financing college education, and the changing relationship between education and marriage and cohabitation¹. His work has been instrumental in providing insights into the changing dynamics of education and its impact on various aspects of society¹.


Source: Conversation with Copilot, 5/24/2024

(1) Richard Fry | Pew Research Center. https://www.pewresearch.org/staff/richard-fry/.

(2) Professor Richard N. Frye dies at 94 — Harvard Gazette. https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2014/04/professor-richard-n-frye-dies-at-94/.

(3) Richard Fry Biography, Age, Height, Wife, Net Worth and Family. https://www.celebsagewiki.com/richard-fry.

(4) Biography Richard D. Fry, Esq. General Counsel, Patriot Coalition. http://www.patriotcoalition.org/docs/Richard-D-Fry-BIO-Feb-2014.pdf.

(5) Richard Fry - Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Fry.



Dana Braga


Dana Braga is a research assistant at Pew Research Center, where she focuses on social and demographic research¹. She has contributed to a variety of publications that delve into key societal issues and trends¹.


Some of her notable works include reports on public K-12 teachers' perspectives¹, race and LGBTQ issues in K-12 schools¹, the increasing number of older workers and their higher wages¹, and the impact of the first year of the pandemic on children's education¹. She has also explored topics such as public opinion on gender advantages in the U.S. and job satisfaction among self-employed people¹.


Braga's research provides valuable insights into various aspects of society, contributing to a deeper understanding of current social and demographic trends¹. Her work at Pew Research Center continues to shed light on important issues, informing public discourse and policy decisions¹.


Source: Conversation with Copilot, 5/24/2024

(1) Dana Braga | Pew Research Center. https://www.pewresearch.org/staff/dana-braga/.

(2) Dana Braga’s Profile | Pew Research Center, Center On Business And .... https://muckrack.com/dana-braga.

(3) List of Delta Force members - Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Delta_Force_members.

(4) undefined. https://www.pewresearch.org/social-trends/2024/02/22/public-views-on-parents-opting-their-children-out-of-learning-about-race-and-lgbtq-issues/.

(5) undefined. https://t.co/rB8MyYCWAc.



Kim Parker

DIRECTOR, SOCIAL TRENDS RESEARCH


Expertise: Demographics and Social Trends


Kim Parker is director of social trends research at Pew Research Center. She oversees research on emerging social and demographic trends, manages major survey projects, and writes and edits reports. Parker was previously the associate director of social and demographic trends research and the research director for the Center’s political unit. Prior to joining Pew Research Center, she worked as a research associate at the American Enterprise Institute. She holds a master’s degree in American government from Georgetown University and a bachelor’s degree from Trinity College. Parker is an author of studies on a variety of topics including gender and work, the changing American family, generational change, higher education, the Great Recession, the middle class, aging, military veterans and Asian Americans. Parker frequently discusses social and demographic trends with journalists and has been interviewed by broadcast outlets such as NPR, NBC, MSNBC and C-SPAN.



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Categorization


This genioux Fact post is classified as Breaking Knowledge which means: Insights for comprehending the forces molding our world and making sense of news and trends.



Type: Breaking Knowledge, Free Speech



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